POST IT

Archive / Publish / After

'Post It' is a curation of ideas around the act of archiving. Existing as an online entity, the project intends to present its findings by employing the techniques being discussed.

“ I’ve always regarded “do it,” “Point d’ironie,” and most of my other initiatives as complimentary to the gallery/museum system… ”

—    Hans Ulrich Obrist, “Can Exhibitions be Collected?” with Noah Horowitz, 2006, in Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Curating, (Sternberg Press: Berlin, 2011), 153.

How might one archive the spatial encounter with something that no longer exists? The destroyed Merzbau is reconstructed and re-presented in the Sprengel Museum. 

1. Kurt Schwitters, Merzbau, photographed by Wilhelm Redemann, 1933.

2. Sprengel Museum’s Merzbau reconstruction, 1981-83

“ …we’re no longer envisioning the archive as an a posteriori accumulation of documents, but the exhibition as an archive that can be mended in situ. ”

—    Hans Ulrich Obrist, “Can Exhibitions be Collected?” with Noah Horowitz, 2006, in Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Curating, (Sternberg Press: Berlin, 2011), 163.

By nature, re-presentations of installations views within typical modes of archiving (such as publications or web feeds) offer an alternate arrangement to its live event/exhibition counterpart.

The ‘re-staging’ (or re-presentation) of Dan Flavin’s 1964 exhibition, Fluorescent Light, is interesting as it offered a new arrangement of the works from the original exhibition, however it remained within physical space its viewers could enter.

Dan Flavin: Fluorescent Light installation view at Green Gallery, New York, 1964.

Dan Flavin: The 1964 Green Gallery Exhibition, installation view at Zwirner & Wirth, 2008.

If an archive is a re-presentation of an event, it is interesting to consider the possibility of an exhibition as an archive.

'When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969 / Venice 2013'

When Attitudes Become Form Bern 1969 / Venice 2013: A re-presentation

Pippa Milne, 'The past is present: the curatorial act of exhibiting exhibitions' in un Magazine 7.2, (un Projects Inc.: Melbourne, 2013), 24 - 29.

“ …this attention to recreating not only the combination of works, but also their setting, the exhibition - as case and contents - appears in some ways a giant readymade. ”

—    Pippa Milne, 'The past is present: the curatorial act of exhibiting exhibitions' in un Magazine 7.2, (un Projects Inc.: Melbourne, 2013), 25.

When discussing the linear encounter inherent in typical formats of archiving, it is perhaps worth investigating the way this may be encountered within an exhibition context.

The series of drawings that are displayed potentially act as an archive of moments the artist has encountered on the train; and it is interesting to see them arranged in a way that lends itself to this discussion.

Kenny Pittock in New 14 at ACCA Melbourne, March 15 to 18 May 2014.

RE-PRESENTATION

Post It considers the act of archiving as a translation of a temporal event to something physical and long-lasting: the re-presentation of artefacts, arrangements and encounters within the exhibition. 

Viewers inhabit the space of an exhibition while readers often look at an archive. With this translation we must begin to think about the different rolls the viewer of an exhibition and the reader of an archive may play, and the way the encounter with artefacts and ideas may alter. 

Thomas Struth, Art Institute of Chicago I, Chicago 1990.Thomas Struth, Art Institute of Chicago II, Chicago 1990.Thomas Struth, Louvre 1, Paris 1989.Thomas Struth, Louvre 4, Paris 1989.

Thomas Struth, Museum Photographs 1

In documenting the encounter between spectator and artwork, this archive takes the form of a photographic art practice.

“ …a work of art, when publicly displayed, almost never stands alone: it is always an element within a permanent or temporary exhibition… ”

—    Mary Anne Staniszewski, 'The Power of Display: A History of Exhibition Installations at the Museum of Modern Art', (MIT Press: Cambridge, 1998), xxi.